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dc.contributor.authorLindsey-Renton, Catriona
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-14T14:02:01Z
dc.date.available2008-02-14T14:02:01Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.otherDIT112547
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10321/190
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)-Dept. of Chiropractic, Durban Institute of Technology, 2005 xiii, 81 leaves ; 30 cmen
dc.description.abstractDamage to the proprioceptive organs, as well as lack of proprioceptive retraining, after an inversion ankle sprain, has been shown to contribute to the problem of recurring ankle joint injuries, which has the highest incidence of sports related injuries. The proprioceptive organs are important as afferent pathways in reflexes and for the adjustment of posture and muscle tone (Miller and Narson, 1995 and Jerosch and Bischof, 1996). Manipulation is thought to cause a change in the afferent pathways of the manipulated joints and it is proposed that this change may restore normal proprioceptive input, in a previously injured joint (Wyke, 1981 and Slosberg 1988). This however is unproven as indicated in a study by Lephart and Fu, (1995), where techniques to improve proprioception remain untested and according to Brynin and Farrar (1995), screening for proprioceptive and neuromuscular co-ordination should be carried out as part of a chiropractor’s physical examination and injury evaluation. This was a qualitative pre-post clinical study. Forty (40) subjects between the ages of 25 and 45, who had been diagnosed with chronic ankle instability syndrome, were recruited.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectChiropracticen
dc.subjectChiropractic--Dissertations, Academicen
dc.subjectAnkle--Wounds and injuriesen
dc.subjectSprainsen
dc.titleThe immediate effect of manipulation in chronic ankle instability syndrome in terms of objective clinical findingsen
dc.typeThesisen


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