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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Liza
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-18T13:48:28Z
dc.date.available2007-10-18T13:48:28Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.other306748
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10321/82
dc.descriptionThesis (M.B.A.)-Business Studies Unit, Durban University of Technology, 2006 xv, 200 leavesen
dc.description.abstractImbalance in the health workforce is a major challenge for health policy-makers, since human resources are the most important of the health systems input (Sanders & Lloyd) Several developed nations are increasingly relying on immigration as a means of coping with domestic shortages of health care professionals (Vujicic et al. 2004). The extent of migration and other losses of professional skills are difficult to quantify. However, the effects of these are multifaceted and have far reaching consequences for both the economy and the maintenance of health services in the country. The effects of this “brain drain” limit service delivery and limit the general population’s access to health services. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of contracting bursary students to the Department of Health (KwaZulu-Natal) as a specialist skills retention strategy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHealth services administrationen
dc.subjectScholarships--South Africaen
dc.subjectMedical policy--South Africaen
dc.subjectStudent aid--South Africaen
dc.subjectPublic health personnel--South Africaen
dc.subjectBusiness administration--Dissertations, Academicen
dc.titleThe effectiveness of contracting bursary students to the Department of Health (KwaZulu-Natal) as a specialist skills retention strategyen
dc.typeThesisen


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