Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/193
Title: A study to determine the relationship between core muscle strength and chronic lower back pain in amateur female road runners and non-runners
Authors: Martin, Susan Leigh
Keywords: Chiropractic;Backache--Measurement;Sports injuries;Pain--Measurement;Running injuries;Chiropractic--Dissertations, Academic
Issue Date: 2006
Abstract: It is well known that the lifetime incidence of lower back pain (LBP) is particularly high (Richardson et al., 1999). Most cases of LBP are self-limiting, however certain regional biomechanical deficits may be overlooked, such as core stability. As a result of this, LBP may become a chronic condition in the athletic and general population. This principle can be applied to road running, as the forces that pass through the muscles of the lower limbs and trunk cannot be properly absorbed if the trunk musculature is not properly trained. This may lead to lower back pain as a result of inadequate functioning and strength of stabilizing structures (Hedrick, 2000). The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to determine the relationship between core muscle strength and chronic lower back pain in amateur female road runners and non-runners. The focus was to determine the core stability values in mmHg between amateur female runners with and without chronic LBP, and female non-runners with and without chronic LBP; as well as to compare female runners and non-runners with regard to core muscle strength.
Description: Thesis (M.Tech.: Chiropractic)-Dept. of Chiropractic, Durban Institute of Technology, 2006 xiv, 61 leaves, Annexures 1-12, 20 leaves
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/193
Appears in Collections:Theses and dissertations (Health Sciences)

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