Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/867
Title: Stable isotope turnover and variability in tail hairs of captive and free-ranging African elephants (Loxodonta africana) reveal dietary niche differences within populations
Authors: Codron, Jacqueline
Kirkman, Kevin
Duffy, Kevin Jan 
Sponheimer, Matt
Lee-Thorp, Julia A.
Ganswindt, Andre
Clauss, Marcus
Codron, Daryl
Keywords: Grass;Diet switching;Seasonality
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: NRC Research Press
Source: Codron, J.; Kirkman, K.; Duffy, K.J.; Sponheimer, M.; Lee-Thorp, J.A.; Ganswindt, A.; Clauss, M.; Codron, D. 'Stable isotope turnover and variability in tail hairs of captive and free-ranging African elephants (Loxodonta africana) reveal dietary niche differences within populations' 2013. Canadian Journal of Zoology 91(3): 124-134
Abstract: Many herbivore species expand their dietary niche breadths by switching from browse-rich diets in dry seasons to grass-rich diets in rainy seasons, in response to phenological changes in plant availability and quality. We analyzed stable isotope series along tail hairs of captive and free-ranging African elephant (Loxodonta africana (Blumenbach, 1797)) to compare patterns of seasonal dietary variability across individuals. Results from elephants translocated from the wild into captivity, where their diets are semicontrolled, revealed tail hair growth rates of 0.34 mm/day, on average, and relatively rapid isotope turnover through the transition from wild into captivity. Sampling hairs at 10 mm increments thus archives dietary chronologies at a resolution suitable for tracking diet switches at seasonal, and even subseasonal, scales. Hairs of free-ranging elephants showed extensive carbon isotopic variability within individuals, consistent with seasonal switches between C3-browsing and C4-grazing. Similarly extensive, but asynchronous, shifts in nitrogen isotope ratios were also observed, suggesting an influence of factors other than seasonality. Across individuals, switching patterns differed across habitats, and across age classes, with older, larger animals including increasing amounts of C3 browse into their diets. These results demonstrate how stable isotope approaches characterize complex patterns of resource use in wildlife populations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10321/867
Appears in Collections:Research Publications (Systems Science)

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